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TOPIC FREQUENCY

Seth Cravens 13, Emery 12, Hugh 6, Us 4, Mr. Cravens 4, Emery Kauanui 4, Hank 3, Attridge 3, United States 2, Erik Kandel 2, Dr. Vincent 2, Yanke 1, Gossip 1, The P.s.a. 1, Ha Ha Ha 1, Alzheimer 's 1, Beta-glucan 1, Hendricks 1, Hepatitis 1, Nomogram 1,
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  NBC    Dateline NBC    News/Business.  
   Investigative journalism. (CC) (Stereo)  

    September 13, 2010
    2:50 - 3:30am EDT  

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powerful effect on your cholesterol. beta-glucan, a type of fiber, is one that has been shown in research to lower cholesterol 24% in just five weeks. in my article, i tell you many sources of this special fiber and how to enjoy them every day. >> this year in the united states, over a million of us will have an operation on our heart or a technique called angioplasty, where we put a balloon and a stent in to open up our arteries and keep them open. these are revolutionary techniques, which can be life-saving for about half the people who have them, but for the other half, a combination of drugs, diet, exercise and a number of strategies that my article talks about that you can use at home, are your best chance of outliving heart disease. >> arthur, if so many angioplasties may be ill-advised, what on earth can you do? have you got anything in your
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black bag for clogged arteries? >> [laughs] you wouldn't believe it. >> maybe i wouldn't, but show me. >> well, let me explain. this new medicine contains a forgotten vitamin, a very special sub-type of vitamin k, tested off the charts in a recent study. people who got enough of it were 52% less likely to have severe calcification in their main arteries and they were 57% less likely to die of heart disease. >> that's significant, definitely life-saving. is it in my multi-vitamin? >> no, not in mine, but this is chock full of it. >> that's mayonnaise. clean arteries with mayonnaise? >> all the details are on page 244 and this same miracle ingredient in mayonnaise may turn out to be a very successful cancer treatment too. >> arthur, since you brought it up, let's talk about so-called "cancer miracles." >> our team examined a huge number of miracle cures that get no headlines and quite a few are
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very much for real. these cures are medically documented in hundreds of scientific journals, yet no one is hearing about them. so let's hear about them now. >> in my article i'll be talking about miracle cures. my first exposure to these was a patient who was an elderly man with bilateral lung cancer throughout his entire lungs. he elected to have no therapy, i discharged him from the hospital to go home to die in the care of his family. to my shock, he showed up in my practice again a year later with perfectly normal lungs and a healthy-looking chest x-ray. it's been said that these things are rare, but we know this isn't so because recent surveys have shown that 50% of america's doctors across all sub-specialties have seen cases in their own practice, which they call miracle cures. so it's important for us to go forward with this information and to introduce it to the public because it gives people
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hope that even in the most serious cases, cure is possible. that's what i'll be talking about in my article. >> vitamin d deficiency is now recognized as a major health problem in both children and adults. the consequences are quite severe: increases risks of common deadly cancers by as much as 50%. we're now recognizing also that vitamin d is important for heart health. it reduces risk of having high blood pressure, may reduce risk of having multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as infectious diseases. this is just some of the many health benefits that you will receive by increasing your vitamin d intake, and i would urge you to review this in the article. >> dr. holick's discoveries about vitamin d fighting cancer are quite impressive, but don't we already get that in fortified foods and multi-vitamins? >> not nearly enough. hugh, i take supplements but i had my own vitamin d levels checked and they were half the minimum acceptable.
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that is really scary, but hugh, this astonishing medicine combats 16 different types of cancer, including breast cancer and ovarian cancer, and it could drive down the death rates by as much as 70%. the fda may soon approve a cancer drug based on vitamin d. but why wait? folks, just do me a favor. for your own health, make sure you're getting the special dosage detailed on page 248. >> i'm beginning to see why you stopped the presses to publish this new expanded edition of ultimate healing. it is monumental. these new medicines could save thousands, maybe even millions of lives, and yet you say they cost pocket change. >> i can't wait till our viewers see our team's new pain breakthroughs. if you've got arthritis, if you've got back pain or migraine headaches, hugh, headache drugs may actually cause rebound headaches worse than before. but here's a new cure that is side-effect free. [♪...] >> you don't need to suffer from headaches because headaches can be prevented.
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it starts with the understanding that virtually all headaches, whether you call them "tension", "sinus" or "migraine", arise from the same source, a mechanism in your brain that becomes activated by a build-up of triggers. in my article, i explain how you can control this, have a better life, and be drug-free. >> each year in the united states, about 300,000 people have surgery for low back pain and sciatica, usually due to disc herniation. in this article we're gonna discuss who is best served with early surgery, who's best served with waiting and what other things you can do to treat yourself to maybe avoid surgery, or if you go to have surgery, to get the most benefit out of it. >> arthur, if surgery may not be the answer for back pain, what is? there's so much conflicting advice. >> believe me, i know. i suffered through agonizing back and foot pain for 18 months, seeing specialist after specialist. as you know, we had to cancel the show because i was in too
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much pain to sit in this chair, until two brilliant doctors finally showed me the breakthroughs on pages 191 and 206. one of them works in seconds and if you've got back pain, you are nuts not to use it in my humble opinion. >> arthur, weight loss is such a big concern now. i read recently that americans pay $35 billion a year for weight loss aids, but do any of them really work? >> our team examined shelves full of weight loss aids and we do have a winner. ordinary vitamin c and now, this little beauty helps you burn nearly 39% more fat every time you work out for about three cents. [♪...] >> have you ever taken a fat burner? did it work? well, i have uncovered a molecule that can burn fat and it's been scientifically tested and proven to work and best of all, it's probably sitting on the shelf in your medicine cabinet right now.
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what could it possibly be? it's vitamin c, but you need to read the book to know how to do it in the correct dosage. >> once upon a time, not so long ago, the only way that you could have aesthetic surgery was to go under the knife and spend time recuperating, spend a great deal of money, have to worry about bruising, have to worry about hiding yourself, but that's not the case anymore. if you read my chapter on lunchtime face lifts for men and women, you'll find out how you can do this in actually a matter of minutes and lose those jowls and lose those lines and lose those furrows without having extensive bruising, without having to go through the knife, not a single cut, not a single stitch and you can have that effect in a matter of minutes. >> now, moving on, you've included another nobel prize winner on your ultimate healing team and this is bottom line health's third nobel prize winner. >> yes, and i could not be prouder to introduce the great dr. erik kandel. he is a beacon of hope to anyone
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suffering alzheimer's disease or memory loss. you see, he won the nobel prize for his work on a molecule called cyclic adenosine monophosphate. this helps create short-term memory, helps turn it into long-term memory, and right now, his associates are testing drugs to unleash this molecule, but you do not have to wait. in the newly expanded edition of ultimate healing, dr. kandel is going to show you how to put his nobel-prize-winning discovery to work immediately. [♪...] >> my name is erik kandel. i've spent the last 50-odd years of my life studying the molecular basis of learning and memory. in this article, i describe not only the biological underpinnings of these phenomena, but also new approaches to overcoming the diseases that haunt memory, both in young people and in the elderly. >> do you know you have something in your kitchen cabinet that's good for you? it's of a very familiar material
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and it's cheap. it's in fact coffee. and in this article, we're gonna tell you some of the health benefits of coffee. for instance, it decreases your risk of type 2 diabetes, it reduces your high blood pressure risk, and last but certainly not least, for all of us, is the problem of cognitive decline in aging, and what coffee does is slow that decline down by 50%. so in this article, we're gonna tell you which coffee you should drink, and which coffee you better not drink because it raises cholesterol. >> coffee... and dr. vincent says it's effective for diabetes as well. >> yes, even if you are obese. just drinking coffee could wipe out your diabetes risk by as much as 50%. it may even protect the beta cells in your pancreas, so you can make all the insulin you need, but you've gotta drink the right kind in the right amounts, so don't miss dr. vincent's
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article. >> arthur, have you got anything in that black bag for acid reflux? i've heard that untreated reflux may lead to esophageal cancer, so this really is serious and it's really common. are acid-blocking drugs a good idea? >> no, absolutely not. these drugs-- like the purple pill-- they actually disrupt your digestion because you need stomach acid to absorb your essential nutrients. they have been linked to hip fracture, pneumonia, even stomach cancer, but, hugh... this special type of calcium tightens the lower esophageal sphincter, shuts off acid reflux without all those side effects for about a nickel. >> now i'd like to ask you about a gripe that older men joke about and that's benign prostate swelling. it's no joke really at all, and prostate drugs have side effects. >> well, how about a pill that's already in your medicine cabinet? >> that's aspirin. seriously? aspirin for prostate health? >> seriously, a mayo clinic study says plain old aspirin
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could shrink your risk for enlarged prostate by 50%. all the details are on page 250. >> now i was concerned to learn recently that one of your colleagues at bottom line health was diagnosed with prostate cancer. how is he doing? >> hugh, it hasn't been easy for him. prostate cancer is scary, but i am delighted to say that he's now cancer-free and one of the cancer doctors who helped him has a breakthrough he wants to share with every prostate cancer patient. [♪...] >> if you or a friend or family member, someone you love has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, you know what a dilemma it is to try to figure out what the right thing to do is. there's watchful waiting, surgery, radiotherapy-- how do you make these decisions? well, we've developed a calculator-- it's free, it's available on the web. it's called a nomogram. you can go to that and enter in the data about your tumor, the p.s.a., the gleason score, the stage of the tumor and learn how likely is it to spread and what would be the result of
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these different treatments. you can learn much more about this in the article in the book. >> arthur, i can't imagine having prostate cancer and not using this, you know? it eliminates all that agonizing guesswork and i'm really impressed that this department chairman at sloan-kettering memorial cancer center would spend so much of his own time on a breakthrough that he wants to give away to our viewers for free. >> exactly, and dr. scardino at sloan-kettering is one of over 700 doctors and scientists volunteering day and night. >> now these new cures in your black bag really are tremendous, but what about those cases when you really have no choice but to use mainstream medicine? you know, what about drug costs? what about hospital bills? what about all those terrible cases when medicare or insurance companies simply reject your claim? you know, this is when your savings can vanish almost instantly. >> hugh, the latest surveys show that even a couple on medicare will need an extra $225,000 in retirement savings just to pay
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for what medicare doesn't cover. >> i'm on medicare and that figure sounds about right to me. but how can your team of doctors, however brilliant they are, help me pay my medical bills? >> well, that's a great question and that is precisely why we've added legions of the world's greatest doctors of jurisprudence-- lawyers-- and former government insiders to our team. they're gonna show you the secret of how to cut these bills in half, without giving up a single medicine you need. [♪...] >> during these challenging economic times, more and more of your personal money is being spent on prescription drugs. the average family is spending hundreds, if not thousands of dollars per year on prescription drugs. the article i have written outlines seven different methods and which you could use to save you at least 50% of your prescription drug costs. the methods are easy, easy to implement, and can save you money. >> many people pay their health insurance premiums on time,
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religiously and for a long period of time, but this doesn't mean your health insurance claim will be paid automatically. in fact, many claims are denied and some people even find their health insurance canceled after they become sick. in my article, i show you six steps to take to make sure your claim is paid and paid on time. this could save you tens of thousands of dollars and in some cases, you may even receive hundreds of thousands of dollars if a claim was wrongfully denied or denied in bad faith. [♪...] >> and hugh, when medicare says no to your claim, you're gonna learn how to make them say yes. if your insurance runs out, page 13 shows you how to get free care at top-notch facilities and this is not medicaid. or if you're a veteran, no country in the world offers more free veteran's benefits, so don't miss the secrets on page 27. >> you know, just paging through the index of this expanded edition of ultimate healing, i'm
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hard-pressed to find any health problem that you haven't addressed and answered. >> you know, 658 pages of breakthroughs you can really use, hugh. wherever you're hurting, this is the one book that shows you how to cure it, and how to afford it. >> but i have to ask you, arthur-- this all looks very exciting-- but how can our viewers be sure these secrets will work for them? >> i am glad you asked. hugh, have you ever heard of a prescription drug that came with a money-back guarantee? ha ha ha! but this expanded edition of ultimate healing comes with a guarantee that's even better. first, if you order in the next 10 minutes, you're gonna get three free gifts of health valued at nearly $60 and these gifts are substantial. let me show you. hugh, first of all, our doctors want to get everyone watching your very own black bag of cures and here it is. hugh, this is the doctor's big black bag of cures and remedies. now we asked over 200 top doctors in nearly every specialty "what's the most surefire secret you've got in your own bag of tricks?"
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>> so you went to the greatest cardiologists and oncologists, rheumatologists... >> brain doctors, back doctors, sex doctors and now you've got your very own big black bag of their greatest secrets. for example, if you've got hepatitis, the herb on page 144 is so effective, you may never need interferon therapy. or if you're tired all the time, there's a 80% chance you're deficient in a cheap little mineral that helps your body burn carbs, page 135. >> that is terrific, but we're pressed for time right now, so let me ask you a million-dollar health question that haunts every american family. >> ask away. >> what about nursing homes? you know, ending your life in a nursing home may be the ultimate health nightmare and it's a financial catastrophe too. it can devour all your assets and leave your surviving family with nothing. >> hugh, you are so right and that's why we want every family watching to have a free gift that can put this nightmare to rest for once and for all. hugh, we asked dozens of older doctors, "what's really putting
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people in nursing homes? what are you doing, doctor, to ensure you don't wind up there?" and then we asked our legal experts what can families do now to protect themselves from getting bankrupted by nursing home costs? >> now these are huge questions, arthur. >> yes, but their secrets turn out to be so easy. for example, if a loved one seems to be losing it, hold on, it may not be alzheimer's. we'll show you how to reverse it, very simple. now imagine getting committed to a nursing home for what's actually a hormone imbalance. this doesn't have to happen to your loved ones if you have this information. >> and this important new book is free? >> yes, everyone who orders in the next 10 minutes gets say never to nursing homes free. >> arthur, this free book is clearly a must for every family with older members, but let me pose another million-dollar question that i personally get asked all the time. ever since our first interview, friends and total strangers have been asking me "how can i get off this drug i'm taking?" >> oh, amen, hugh. prescription drugs cost a fortune and we all hate
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the side effects. now i couldn't avoid them entirely during my own 18-month illness, but i also discovered some fantastic alternatives and we put our team to work for everyone's benefit. hugh, here are the top 50 natural alternatives for today's best-selling drugs. now we asked our all-star team of doctors "what do you take for your own health problems?" and you would be shocked by how many mainstream physicians are secretly using these natural solutions. you're not gonna see these natural drug alternatives advertised because the makers aren't even allowed to tell you that they treat or cure disease. >> this information is extraordinary all by itself and it's free. >> for the next 10 minutes, yes, and it's just one of three free gifts. our viewers are getting over a thousand pages of medical breakthroughs. >> that is really staggering, arthur. >> hugh, let me add it up. the big black bag is valued at $39.95. say never to nursing hom is valued at $9.95. the top 50 natural
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alternatives, that's valued at $9.95 and the regular price for the new greatly expanded ultimate healing is $59.95. that's a total value of $119.80. i want to give everyone watching the power to get healthy again without vaporizing your savings. that's why three nobel prize winners and over 700 more world-acclaimed doctors and scientists have volunteered for this project and taken no pay. >> so how much will our viewers pay, arthur? >> well we know that every dollar counts for our viewers so even though this enormous, expanded hardbound edition of ultimate healing totals 658 pages, our viewers will only pay $39.95, plus shipping and handling. >> that's a tremendous value for the biggest book you've ever made available. three free gifts and a total of over a thousand pages of new information? >> yes, yes, and i wanna extend a very special guarantee that i personally insisted on: the
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very first day you open the covers of the expanded ultimate healing, bottom line health guarantees you'll see how to save at least 10 times what you paid, or i want you to send it back for a full return of your purchase price less shipping and handling, and keep the doctor's big black bag, keep say never to nursing homes, keep the top 50 natural alternatives, keep all three gifts for free, so you can't lose. no matter what, you're getting three free gifts worth nearly $60. >> we are nearly out of time, arthur. >> hugh, i'd just like to share a personal word with our viewers. look, over the past months, i faced a huge health crisis of my own. i was practically disabled with back and foot pain that defied five different specialists. every week i was doing a different new therapy, every day i was writing a different check and i vowed if i can overcome this, i am gonna do my darndest to help everyone else escape this hell of pain, suffering and endless bills, so i am now on a
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mission to see you never suffer these agonies, these indignities ever again. the discoveries that healed me, they're in this book and i pray and believe they'll heal you too, so now it's your turn. please, pick up the phone and get these great doctors working for you. give their new breakthroughs a chance to change your life. that's all they're asking for in return for all their volunteer work. you won't risk a cent. you'll get three free gifts, but most importantly, for the first time in years, i believe you are going to start feeling better each and every day. it is such a wonderful feeling. it happened for me. i know it can happen for you, but only if you call us now. >> i'd also like to say a few words to our audience, arthur. over the course of my life, i've personally cared for loved ones who thankfully overcame life-threatening health emergencies. it's difficult both physically and mentally. there's nothing more important and valuable than waking up each
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day feeling good. life is meant to be lived comfortably and with peace of mind. i've examined the new publications here and the credentials of the doctors behind them. i believe their new information could indeed save your life, save you many thousands of dollars and bring you the knowledge you need to weather the storm of your own health crisis. our health always seems much more valuable after we start to lose it, but with these volumes at your fingertips, that never has to happen. pick up your phone and call now. and thank you, arthur. >> it's been an honor, hugh. [♪...] [clicking...] [beep-beep, zips...] [clack]
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hendricks, the college kid doing his 90 days in jail after copping a plea. who attacked hank and why? gossip at the jail was this -- somebody had put out the word that hank would testify for the prosecution. so before hank took his place in court, now neatly dressed in a pressed shirt and a tie, there was more than a little speculation. would the least likely bandit testify against seth cravens' version of events?
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the same question held for bandit matt yanke, still serving time in jail. but what happened in court? both bandits stood by seth cravens and stuck to their story. >> emery came at eric swinging. eric was bleeding pretty profusely. >> reporter: it was emery who was the aggressor, they said. emery who handily beat up one of the other bird rock bandits. and when emery's girlfriend jenny arrived, hank said he pulled her away because -- >> just as i said one time, you don't know what's going on. she was hitting the guy that just got beat up in a fight. >> at that point what did mr. house look like physically? >> he looked pretty bad. his face had started to begun bleeding. and i could notice that he was looking on the ground for something. >> eric started going on all fours. he was pretty disoriented by his speech. he was saying, i got to find my tooth, where's my tooth.
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he was feeling the concrete for his tooth. and he was saying, i'm done, i'm done, i'm done. eric was saying, you got me, you got me, it's over, it's over. >> reporter: and that's the moment that seth cravens came to the aid of their good friend eric. >> he's done, get off of him. >> reporter: seth pushed emery back towards the middle of the street and said it's over with. >> how far apart were they from one another? >> probably started about five or ten feet, then got to right in each other's face. >> reporter: right in each other's face, not feet apart as jenny grosso had claimed. and matt yanke said it was emery who moved in. >> then i saw emery -- i saw seth back away from the situation and i saw emery charge at seth and he's saying, you know, a lot of stuff. why do you guys come over here? why are you guys doing this? and he's talking to seth. comes right to him, about inches before his face and starts to swing with his right arm. then i saw seth throw a left and
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connect with emery in the jaw. >> reporter: this was the moment for the defense. if emery came at seth within inches of his face, if he swung his arm, wasn't seth's punch self-defense? the prosecutor had a problem. if the jury believed that version of the story, how could she win a conviction for second degree murder? she questioned both bandits relentlessly, but neither budged from their story of the fight. so prosecutor roach found another way to paint cravens guilty. his reaction to the fatal punch. >> mr. cravens was bragging about knocking emery out with his left hand, wasn't he? >> yes. it was more surprised that he knocked him out with one punch from his left hand. >> did you describe it as bragging? >> yes, you could take it as bragging. >> reporter: now it was time for each side to pull all strands of testimony and evidence together and sell its version of that night, that fight to the jury. after nine days of testimony, closing arguments, for
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prosecutor roach, this whole case was about a man who simply didn't care about others and the pain he might inflict on them. >> everything in our human experience tells us that blows to the head can be deadly. despite that fact, seth cravens was giving the victim punishing blow after punishing blow to the head. >> reporter: this was it. the prosecutor's last shot at the bird rock bandit. she was going to drill it into everybody, seth cravens had a pattern, seth cravens was not a good man. >> never, ever challenge him. he will come to your house with four of his friends. he will punch you with so much force that it will cause a fracture consistent with being hit in the head with a baseball bat. and he will laugh about it later.
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>> reporter: defense attorney attridge came back at the prosecution hard, arguing the facts of the case just didn't fit the law. >> who knew that one left-handed punch could result in this death? mr. cravens' left fist is not a dangerous or deadly weapon. one punch? is not cruel or unusual. and importantly, there is no evidence that mr. cravens consciously disregarded a danger to human life. >> reporter: she knew she needed some drama. a big forceful gesture to demonstrate her point that seth acted in self-defense, that the case against him was a runaway train. but no one was expecting the drama she unleashed. >> and i think when you consider the following fact, you will know that this prosecution has been a runaway train.
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and that fact is that emery kauanui got within five inches of seth cravens and said, how the [ bleep ] how the [ bleep ] how the [ bleep ] you are going to come over to my house! 2-2. thank you. >> reporter: now what would the jury think about that? coming up -- the verdict. >> we the jury in the above-entitled cause find the defendant seth cravens --
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november 10th, 2008, a year and a half after a spilled drink at a bar and a left-handed punch that killed a budding surfing phenomenon named emery kauanui. a san diego courtroom was, well, astonished. >> emery kauanui got within five inches of seth cravens and said, how the [ bleep ], how the [ bleep ], how the [ bleep ] you come to my house! 2-2. thank you. >> reporter: and what sort of look was on the faces of members of the jury? >> well, it was kind of a universal gaping of the mouths. everywhere in the courtroom. i think the judge was wide-eyed. it was a wild thing to do. >> reporter: what was she trying to do? well for one thing, said attridge, she wanted the prosecutor to react physically.
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>> she had the presence of mind, much to my chagrin, not to hit me. it would have been fabulous. >> reporter: you know what she wanted? >> i'm quite sure what she wanted. >> reporter: she wanted you to take a shot at her. was there anything? >> never entered my mind. never occurred to me. never. that i would get up and strike somebody. never. >> reporter: perhaps not. but now that incident joined the story the jury had to sort out on its own. >> it was something we certainly discussed. >> it was like wow. >> reporter: but had her defense succeeded? jury foreman rick kree. >> we actually struggled. >> reporter: the debate said fellow jurors was intense. there were two kind of distinctly different stories about what happened in that
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fight, one from the defense, one from the prosecution. >> everybody knew the bottom line was a punch was thrown, emery fell back and hit his head and died four days later. so really what it was is just paying really close attention to all those circumstances surrounding it. >> and nobody disagreeing that seth cravens threw the punch. >> reporter: was it hard to decide whether or not that crossed the bar to become a murder? >> for me it was. >> reporter: the hang-up was one troublesome legal term, implied malice. days went by. they couldn't decide exactly what it meant. it gave you a lot of trouble? >> four criteria had to be met for it to be implied malice. >> reporter: that's what you needed to get to second degree murder. >> one was at the time he acted he knew the act was dangerous to human life, the natural consequences of the act was dangerous to human lie. >> he intentionally committed the act. at the time he committed the act he did it with conscious
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disregard for human life. >> reporter: had seth cravens crossed those legal lines? they simply couldn't agree. >> we're unable to reach a unanimous decision. >> reporter: at one point you sent a note back and said, you couldn't do this. and the judge wasn't buying that either. >> without telling me which way the majority is leaning, what is the numerical spread, the final vote. >> 11-1. >> reporter: seth's parents believed the number had to be in their son's favor. >> so everybody's 11-1, okay, we just need to convince one more person. >> reporter: in favor of the defense? >> yes, in favor of the defense. >> reporter: back in the jury room, they debated, argued, struggled until finally eight days after they received the case. >> the verdict, we the jury in the above entitled cause find the defendant seth cravens guilty of the crime of implied malice murder in the second degree. >> reporter: the jury found seth
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cravens guilty of second degree murder for throwing the left-handed punch that killed emery kauanui. and -- >> find defendant seth cravens guilty of the crime of criminal threat -- >> reporter: guilty on all but three of the lesser counts. >> it was an enormous shock. >> it seemed unbelievable. >> everybody was surprised. >> reporter: his attorney mary ellen attridge took it hard. >> i was just devastated. it was awful. >> reporter: it was shocking after -- >> it was shocking, it was depressing. you know? because there's so much loss of life that happened in the case. here's two guys in their 20s. none of this needed to happen. so it was a very, very difficult verdict. >> reporter: but for emery's mother cindy, this was a long awaited verdict. and the next step, sentencing, would be the final measure of justice for her son. >> the judge would come up with the right judgment and trusting that god will give him wisdom.
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and i just have to look forward. i'm not going to live in the past. >> reporter: seth, who did not testify at his trial, finally spoke at his sentencing if only to say how sorry he was. >> i just want to say sorry to emery's family. i'm so sorry that it's happening. i'm sorry for your loss. i do pray that you guys find some kind of peace and comfort. i'm sorry. i'm sorry to my own family. everybody that had to go through this with me. i'm real sorry. >> reporter: his sentence? there would be no second chances for seth. the judge handed him 20 years to life. all the more severe considering that plea bargain he turned down. before seth was led away to serve his time, attorney attridge tried one last request. >> mr. cravens would respectfully request the ability to give his parents and his fiancee a hug. >> can't do it. i'm sorry. >> reporter: then the last of the bird rock bandits shuffled off to prison.
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for those who loved emery, seth's sentence was not merely just, but a warning. >> i think it's a good testimony of the justice system at work, and i think that people should watch this and they should know that they can't get away with these things. >> reporter: cindy kauanui did not attend the trial. too painful. but she sees the waves come in at wind and sea, emery's beach. and she's glad for his 24 years. and she says to parents everywhere, don't waste the time you have. >> look after your kids. listen to your kids. listen to them. because they tell you things. all kids have things that they struggle with and fears. and my son was no different. and he struggled with a lot of things in life. but you got to just stay close to them. >> reporter: this is a wake-up call for that. >> it's a wake-up call for the community, yeah, and a wake-up call for parents. ♪